Fabrizio Modonese Palumbo – Doropea (C30, Old Bicycle Records)

ambient, Drone, Noise, Review

Doropea is an homage to Fabrizio Modonese Palumbo’s hometown of Torino, in reference to that town’s fountains and in part the rivers that make up its geography. In true thematic fashion Doropea is split into two parts, just like the duality of the two rivers. Both span one side and about 15 minutes, and they document two different styles for this artist.

The first side is a hypnotic series of sustained feedback drone tones with occasional found sounds, like the clacking of a typewriter. The whole thing is held together by occasional piano plinking and organ work, creating an ambient soundscape that works very well to pull the listener in. It feels organic and thoughtful, almost bucolic, and it’s an enjoyable fifteen minutes.

The second part also incorporates found sounds, although this one tends focus more on droning electronic elements. A faint repetitive tone seems to be sourced from the track’s early snoring recording, and Fabrizio Modonese Palumbo allows the track to expand outward from its initial drones, even giving the track some humming every now and then. It even quiets down for a slow climax outro, a twinkling echoing synth line that ends the album.

Doropea is an interesting release and one that certainly captures the intricate essence of “home” for an outsider; the ideas here help tell the story of what Palumbo memorializes from Torino, and it’s a deeply pleasant motif.

Mulo Muto/B E T A – Tape Crash #11: The Examination (C60, Old Bicycle Records)

ambient, Drone, Noise, Review

mulo muto beta

Mulo Muto is the duo of Joel Gilardini and Attila Folklor, a project of synths, guitars, and drones; B E T A is from Michele Basso and Marcello Bellina, and they mostly utilize guitars for a hypnotic, psych-y trance dance. Old Bicycle Records’ Tape Crash is a series of cassettes seemingly matching up artists for a split, and really The Examination could not have worked out better for two alike projects.

First up is Mulo Muto with their side-long droning piece “When the Sounds of Nature Collide With Our Inner Selves and Resurface As a Stream of Noises.” It’s about a half an hour long and sees Mulo Muto combining dark synth tones with a wall of buzzing rumbles. Beginning with insect chirrups, the track picks up into a droning crescendo, offering up the collision of the title for chants and radio transmission buzzes. Eventually we come down again after a glorious high, coming back to more nature sounds and some wind chimes.

B E T A offer up five songs on the second side, often of thick reverbed guitar and noise effects. “Pluto is a Planet to My Heart” gives a quick summation of what’s to come, a short track of soft guitar plucking, climaxing up until a “Shhhh…” quietens everything. “The New Order Song” starts with a guitar track and some junky electronic crackles before becoming a spacey jam of dueling guitar riffs. “Kill Collins!” shimmers, then rumbles, with a ton of reverberation leaving the ears tickled, until the Death in June cover “Behind the Rose” calms things; the original song is preserved, but under a heavy dose of echo that more resembles Boris at their noisiest. “Karma, please” is a sinister guitar riff, one taking the lead while the other strums out backing notes; “A (Ha Ha)” rounds it out with a crunchy, modulated riff and some moaned, ghostly vocals.

If Tape Crash is meant to be a way of seeing how two artists sound mashed up onto one cassette, then Old Bicycle Records have done a fantastic job on The Examination. Either way, this is a solid cassette all around from two very capable artists; Mulo Muto starts things with a lengthy, ambient drone, and B E T A provide a soundtrack of guitar manipulations. If you can’t find this tape, then just listen to the thing on Bandcamp.

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