Justic Marc Lloyd – Your (CD, Love Earth Music)

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your

“[Your is a] conceptual effort intended as a highlight of JML’s output,” the album notes state for Justic Marc Lloyd’s solo release, and this is as good a summary as any that I can think of. Over the course of multiple monikers in the noise hemisphere, including Pregnant Spore, Dementia and Hope Trails, and his wall output as False Flag, Lloyd has spanned the gamut of the genre: HNW, harsh noise, drone, tape loops, electronics, glitch. Not every release incorporates all of these elements, but Lloyd has been right there on all of them, successfully delivering excellent releases at every turn. On Your, he combines all of these sub-genres for an eleven-track album that sums up his diverse discography perfectly.

Your is not a collection of eclectic songs that have relatively little in common with each other. Despite the variability of sound, Lloyd has crafted an album that swings effortlessly between genres, often in the same track. “Feeling Submissive? Signal Two: A Thumbing” strikes a balance between the wonky tape loops and the rhythmic, as does “The Number Five Tasted Wrong, Part 2.” The opening moments are full of Lloyd’s penchant for grabbing interesting sound clips and pairing them off together.

The album continues into the other elements Lloyd has worked with in the past. “Most of the World” is a guitar-driven psychedelic swirl complete with whispered vocals and a clicking computer error chirrup; similar things occur in “Most of Our World,” but with a more electronic bent. Lloyd follows many of his tracks with a sequel part, using many of the same elements in unique ways; it keeps Your feeling fresh and focused, continually reusing and recycling similar sounds.

“Seemingly Under-Lion Self-Talk in the Form of Adam’s Sharp and Heavy Apple” hits on the harsh noise wall crunch with a high-pitched but lo-fi feedback rumble before opening up into an airy drone. Your ends with a couple of rhythmic, warped numbers, one of which spans for nearly ten minutes, to finish strongly.

Lloyd has really crafted a fantastic disc, and any of those who have followed his other work will find themselves right at home with nearly an hour of material. Your is meant to be a comment on motivational works and especially those of Wayne Dyer, and it’s hard not to come away from the album with a more positive light despite the discordance: accept the chaos and malfunction, because “you feel how you think.”

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